Tahzibul Akhlaq

Tahzibul Akhlaq

SSN_1994



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Introduction:

Sir Syed Ahmad Khan was in Banaras, when his son, Syed Mahmud, was awarded a scholarship for higher studies in England by the British government of India. Accordingly, Sir Syed along with his son, Syed Mahmud and Syed Hamid, started for London on 1st April 1869. In London, he came across two social journals of social reformation, SPECTATOR and most probably TETLOR. These two journals inspired Sir Syed to start a journal to reforms the muslims of India. Sir Syed knew that in the past, muslims excelled in the field of technology, business, medicine and other professions of life. But the same community had distanced away from these fields and started believing that acquiring the knowledge of these fields is a blasphemy. In a letter to his close friend Nawab Mohsinul Mulk, he discussed the idea of Tahzeebul Akhlaq, a journal for the social reformation of Muslims of India. He returned to Banaras, after an absence of about 19 months, in October, 1870. On 24th December, Sir Syed launched “ Tahzibul Akhlaq”.

Objectives of Tahzibul Akhlaq:

1. Establishment of Social Harmony among the Muslims of India.
2. Revival of True Islamic Traditions
3. Remove the misconception of Islam from the masses in regards with modern developments

Tahzibul Akhlaq faced stiff resistance from the muslims of India but at the same time if found its well wishers also. Nawab Mohsinul Mulk, Maulvi Muhammad Chiragh Ali Khan, Maulvi Mushtaq Hussain, Maulana Altaf Hussain Haali, Shamsul Ulema Maulvi Zakaullah, Shamsul Ulema Allama Shibli Nomani, Maulvi Mehdi Hasan, Syed Mahmood and Sir Syed wrote many articles on social and religious reforms. Tahzeebul Akhlaq was trying to present the true picture of Islam. From the inception in 1870 till 1881, Tahzibul Akhlaq was discontinued twice and finally in 1881 it was merged with Aligarh Gazette.

Revival of Tahzibul Akhlaq:

After a century later, in 1981, a staunch supporter of Aligarh Movement and an AMU alumnus, Syed Hamid, the then Vice-Chancellor of Aligarh Muslim University felt the need of Tahzeebul Akhlaq. He discussed the idea with few learned members of concerned of community and re-started Tahzeebul Akhlaq as a Bi-monthly private journal. A committee was formed.

Chief Editor: Mr. Syed Hamid (Vice-Chancellor, Aligarh Muslim University)

Editor: Mr. Qazi Moizuddin (Aligarh).

Treasurer: Dr. Manzar Abbas Naqvi (Dept. of Urdu, Aligarh Muslim University)

Mr. Syed Hamid put his best to bring back the past glory Tahzeebul Akhlaq, started by Sir Syed Ahmad Khan. In a short span of time, the journal became popular and made good inroads into the hearts and minds of Muslims and the intellectual community of Muslims of India. In 1983, Prof. Noorul Hasan Naqvi of Department of Urdu took over the charge of editorship of the journal. He engaged young research scholar Dr. Qamrul Huda Faridi as Honorary Assistant Editor for the journal. The journal was still not self sustainable so the team launched a Life membership drive for Rs.1000/- which received a good response and fetched a decent amount of money which was deposited into Bank as Fixed Deposit and the income generated from this fixed deposit made the journal self sustainable.

In April 1985, Syed Hashim Ali joined as Vice-Chancellor of Aligarh Muslim University. Till then, Tahzeebul Akhlaq was a private entity. Upon the request of the Tahzeebul Akhlaq team, Aligarh Muslim University acquired Tahzeebul Akhlaq and allocated required administrative staff and building and made Aligarh Muslim University Vice-Chancellor as its Patron.

Special Issues of Tahzibul Akhlaq

TA_Vol2
TA_Vol3
TA_Vol4
SSN_2007
SSN_2006
SSN_2005
SSN_2003
SSN_2002
SSN_2001
SSN_2000
SSN_1996
SSN_1994

Tahzibul Akhlaq 2014

Tahzibul Akhlaq 2014

Source : www.amu.ac.in

Advisory Council


Advisory Council

21_Syed_Hamid
Syed Hamid
Vice-Chancellor, AMU Aligarh
Prof. Kabir Ahmad Jaisi (Aligarh) Prof. Masood Alam (Aligarh) Mr. Ahmad Rasheed Sherwani (New Delhi)
Director,
Center of Promotion of Science,
Aligarh Muslim University Aligarh
Director,
Center of Promotion Educational and Cultural Advancement,
Aligarh Muslim University Aligarh

Dr. Abu Sufiyan Islahi (Secretary)

Editorial Board

Editorial Board


Editor : Dr. Abu Sufiyan Islahi

Joint Editor : Dr. Qamrul Huda Faridi

Assistant Editor : Mr. Ahmad Mujtaba Quraishi

Ex-Editors

Editors:

Sir Syed Ahmad Khan -1870-1881

Mr. Qazi Moizuddin (Aligarh) -1981-83

Prof. Nurul Hasan Naqvi (Department of Urdu)- 1983-June 1986

Prof. Israr Ahmad (Department of Physics) – June 1986-1990

Prof. Kabir Ahmad Jaisi (Department of Islamic Studies) 1990-93

Prof. Masood Alam (Department of Urdu)- 1993- Apr. 1995

Prof. Mohammad Nayeem (Department of Urdu) -Apr.1995-96

Prof. Abul Kalam Qasmi (Department of Urdu)- 1996-2012

Joint Editors:

Dr. Qamrul Huda Faridi (Department of Urdu) – 1983-Till date

Prof. Kabir Ahmad Jaisi (Department of Islamic Studies) – 1986-1990

Assistant Editors:

Dr. Shababuddin (Department of Urdu) -1986-1992

Mr. Ahmad Mujtaba Quraishi – 1986-Till date

Mashaheer-e-Aligarh Number of Tahzibul Akhlaq

SSN_1994

Mashaheer-e-Aligarh Number of Tahzibul Akhlaq




Afzal Usmani

Education and social reform are the two planks of Aligarh Movement and Tahzibul Akhlaq was one of the tool used by Sir Syed Ahmad to achieve his mission.


The primary objective of Tahzibul Akhlaq was:

Establishment of Social Harmony among the Muslims of India.

Revival of True Islamic Traditions

Remove the misconception of Islam from the massed in regards with modern developments


Since the revival of Tahzibul Akhlaq which took place in 1981, some of its primary ingredients were missing. Most of its article were of pure academic nature and a very specific audience was targeted. Instead of becoming a journal to spread awareness and follow the guidelines of its founder to stick to its aims and objective, it kept drifting away from its aim and objective.


After taking the lead in Idarah Tahzibul Akhlaq, its editor published 2 volumes of "Quran Number" in 2012 and planning to publish Mashaheer-e-Aligarh number in 2013. So far only "Sir Syed Number" is getting published every year in October. It is very pleasant news that the Editor Dr. Abu Sufyan Islahi is bringing out special issues.


During my recent visit to Aligarh, I met many people including Editor TAHZIBUL AKHLAQ, Dr. Abu Sufyan Islahi.
It was a good news for me when he informed that a special Issue on the eminent figures of Aligarh (Mashaheer-e-Aligarh) will be published shortly by Idara-e-Tahzibul Akhlaq & Nishant, A.M.U., Aligarh. This special issue is based on about 30 (thirty) articles, on the renowned scholars and personalities of Aligarh, which contains at least 350 pages. All the articles will be based on the latest research, analysis and criticism. This publication will bring into light the Cultural, Historical, Literary and Informative aspects of Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. Hopefully the publication will enhance the academic profile of not only Tahzibul Akhlaq but also of the Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. Hope the trend continues and Tahzibul Akhlaq can find its lost glory and true purpose.


This is also very sad the journal started by Sir Syed only has around 1000 subscription. I will take this opportunity to request to the members of Aligarh Fraternity and Sir Syed's follower to subscribe the journal.

Subscriptions:

India:
Annual: 100/- Rs
Life Member: 1000/-Rs.

Abroad:
By Airmail: 30$ (USD)
By Surface Mail: 15$ (USD)
Life Membership 300$(USD)

Address:

Editor
Tahzeebul Akhlaq & Nishant
1- Shibli Road, AMU Aligarh (UP) –India -202002

Tel: +571-2703027

http://aligarhmovement.com/institutions/tahzibul_akhlaq/contact






Redefining the Role of AMU: Revitalizing the Tehzeebul Akhlaq

SSN_1994

Redefining the Role of AMU:

Revitalizing the Tehzeebul Akhlaq



Dr. M. Sajjad* & Dr. Amir Ali**

In the year 1870, the Tehzeebul Akhlaq (Mohammedan Social Reformer), an Urdu monthly, was launched by Sir Syed Ahmad (1817-98). It was a medium of propaganda of the Aligarh Movement. The sole objective of the Aligarh Movement was empowerment of Muslims, primarily through modern education (which would inevitably lead to political consciousness, but that was expediently and strategically left for sometime). But unfortunately, the agenda of empowerment still remains unfulfilled (as much glaringly catalogued by the Sachar Committee Report, not to say of the previous reports like this). Nothing can be more obvious than the fact that today the AMU is a campus in disarray and the journal that was started by its founder is reduced to little more than a campus magazine with a paltry circulation of under 2000, whereas only the campus of AMU has around 50,000 people (including both employees and students).
The Tehzeebul Akhlaq served as the vehicle through which the ideas of the Aligarh Movement could be disseminated among a wider audience. Though Aligarh had to be the centre where the ideas of political modernization and empowerment would first be conceived, it was the Tehzeebul Akhlaq that would take these ideas to the people at large. It thereby served two functions: the progressive infiltration of such ideas among the people to remove the bias against reform and progress and secondly to make the people aware of the political strategy of the Aligarh Movement. It thereby delineated the best strategy to adopt under the circumstances that the Indian Muslims of 19 th century found themselves in.


Today when the Aligarh Muslim University's role as the intellectual rallying point of the Muslim community is under doubt, it is important to begin a process of re-thinking regarding the exact contribution that the university can make. The sad story of the AMU especially in the past two decades is of a campus that is ailing. It suffers from periodic bouts of rowdyism, violence and controversies. Such a situation can obviously never be conducive to the expression of new ideas about the uplift of the Muslim community. It is important that the university maintains its character as the leader of the progressive and forward looking sections of the community. One of the best ways to do this would be by reviving the Tehzeebul Akhlaq as a journal of social reform among the Muslims and by drawing upon its historical legacy as the vehicle of such ideas.


Rightly or wrongly, the vice Chancellor occupies a special position in the university, which is incomparable to the kind of influence other vice chancellors enjoy in their universities. This being the case, his offices and persona could be effectively used to actualize the said objective. AMU's VCs have long been perceived as not just the head of this important institution but also a leader committed to the educational uplift of the Indian Muslims. In this manner the VCs would be able to effectively reach out to and communicate with other sections of the community through the debating platform that this magazine ought to be.


In the 21st century, the media is all-pervasive and the social groups without an influence in the media will remain quite vulnerable . So having an influential voice for the Indian Muslims is a sine qua non. The media is being projected as the 'super power', 'demon', 'underworld' and so on and so forth. Many scholars have pointed out that the Indian Muslims must have a media of their own. Theodre P Wright, V.T. Rajshekhar etc have emphasized this point. In a democratic world the key to people's empowerment is information and opinion mobilization. This can be done through intensely informed debates, dialogues and discussions. For this kind of debate the historical legacy of the Tehzeebul Akhlaq can be used rather than launching a new magazine. In this magazine, rather than displaying a personality cult with which almost all the newspapers are afflicted, there should be an editorial every month which could address the various issues confronting the community.


Here it is imperative to point out that the problems of the Muslim community/communities can not be addressed in isolation from the problems of other vulnerable groups of society. The magazine should be able to contextualize the problem of the Indian Muslim communities in the larger framework of the ongoing struggles for empowerment and democratization. Thus, the magazine would be able to contribute in substantial measure to the re-vitalization and re-juvenation of the Indian civil society. The magazine, through its articles and discussions should be able to penetrate existing structures of inequality and power within the community. This would be done by seeking support from other progressive sections from outside and in turn allying with them to exert pressure on the state.


The editorial need not necessarily come out with an answer to the question; it should rather put the problem with all the intricacies and dynamics involved in the question. Needless to say, the editorial should be the outcome of a group effort engaging the noted scholars on the issues. In short, the editorial should problematize the various issues. The rest of the pages should provide space to the writers of every school of thought so that the democratic spirit remains integral to the magazine. This would be a welcome change from the usual practice of the Urdu newspapers, which indulge in refusing to give space to contending views. Moreover, a sufficient space should be given for letters to the editor so that all the necessary improvements could be brought about in the magazine. This column should further become a debating platform. Since it will be a views-magazine rather than a newsmagazine so it must cover all the contemporary problems of the community quite meaningfully and relevantly. The magazine must be in the thick of all the intense debates that have engulfed the community and will in all probability do so in the future.


To bring out a magazine of this nature it is important that an editorial structure and team of extremely high caliber is built up. The post of editor along with an editorial committee should be kept aside for those serious scholars who have done serious researches in the area and who are committed to bringing about some kind of reform. This would also involve complete computerization of the editorial offices and handsome remuneration for the contributors. All these efforts will obviously require a sufficient capital base. Two things can be done about this. Old boys or alumni of AMU employed in important and lucrative professions around the world can be requested to help raise funds. Apart from the alumni, many sympathizers can contribute to re-vitalize the Tehzeebul Akhlaq. Simultaneously with such a highly enriched content, a scientifically aggressive marketing campaign can be launched. Thousands of copies can be sold within the campus and there would be a number of alumni across the world who would be only too willing to subscribe. Once this takes place possibilities of commercial advertisement will automatically help to raise the capital base, making the journal financially self-sustaining. AMU students and Old boys' network would of course be helpful in promoting the sales.


While the Tehzeebul Akhlaq was a journal started by the Aligarh community to keep alive the spirit of Sir Syed's reform movement it is important that the journal does not remain confined to the 'limited' aims and intent of the founder which was to persuade the Muslims to go for modern education. The debate about modern education has largely been resolved and this in itself was a remarkable contribution of the journal. Today the context has changed and it is here that the journal's role needs to be re-defined. It is a context that is defined by the need to empower socially and politically marginalized sections across the world and it is precisely this issue that the journal needs to address.







*Dr. Mohammad Sajjad, Asstt. Prof., Centre of Advanced Study in History, AMU Aligarh

**Dr. Amir Ali, Asstt. Prof., CPS, JNU, New Delhi 110067

Tahzibul Akhlaq - Quran Number

SSN_1994

Quran Number of Tahzibul Akhlaq




Afzal Usmani

Education and social reform are the two planks of Aligarh Movement and Tahzibul Akhlaq was one of the tool used by Sir Syed Ahmad to achieve his mission.


The primary objective of Tahzibul Akhlaq was:

Establishment of Social Harmony among the Muslims of India.

Revival of True Islamic Traditions

Remove the misconception of Islam from the massed in regards with modern developments


Since the revival of Tahzibul Akhlaq which took place in 1981, some of its primary ingredients were missing. Most of its article were of pure academic nature and a very specific audience was targeted. Instead of becoming a journal to spread awareness and follow the guidelines of its founder to stick to its aims and objective, it kept drifting away from its aim and objective.


So far only "Sir Syed Number" is getting published every year in October. It is very pleasant news that the newly appointed Editor Dr. Abu Sufyan Islahi is bringing out a special issue in May, 2012 on Quran. Hope the trend continues and Tahzibul Akhlaq can find its lost glory and true purpose.


This is also very sad the journal started by Sir Syed only has around 700 subscription. I will take this opportunity to request to the members of Aligarh Fraternity and Sir Syed's follower to subscribe the journal.

Subscriptions:

India:
Annual: 100/- Rs
Life Member: 1000/-Rs.

Abroad:
By Airmail: 30$ (USD)
By Surface Mail: 15$ (USD)
Life Membership 300$(USD)

Address:

Editor
Tahzeebul Akhlaq & Nishant
1- Shibli Road, AMU Aligarh (UP) –India -202002

Tel: +571-2703027

http://aligarhmovement.com/institutions/tahzibul_akhlaq/contact






Contact for subscription

office pic

Subscriptions:

India:
Annual: 100/- Rs
Life Member: 1000/-Rs.

Abroad:
By Airmail: 30$ (USD)
By Surface Mail: 15$ (USD)
Life Membership 300$(USD)

Address:

Editor
Tahzeebul Akhlaq & Nishant
1- Shibli Road, AMU Aligarh (UP) –India -202002

Tel: +571-2703027
Email : tahzibulakhlaq.aligarh@gmail.com

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Zoha Usmani